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1

Friday, December 30th 2011, 2:27am

Charlie Don't Surf Spread

Hi, folks!

I see a lot of movement on the new events around EoD!

And I think that C.D.S event is very important to keep up the heat!

The CDS clock was a very nice idea!

I think that some banners and buttons that we could display on our blogs/sites to a page that wolud explain the event would leverage a lot the participation on the event.

I have a blog and I would like to priomote it, so would a lot o people!

How about it!
"Only the dead have seen the end of war."
George Santayana, Soliloquies in England and Later Soliloquies (1922) misattributed to Plato, (c. 427 BC – c. 347 BC).

2

Saturday, January 14th 2012, 1:12pm

Perhaps you can create some banners so we can share it with other sites like hslan.de, bf-games.net and many more?

3

Sunday, January 22nd 2012, 10:17pm

Perhaps you can create some banners so we can share it with other sites like hslan.de, bf-games.net and many more?


I've prepared a poster/flyer, a banner and button are harder (smaller), but of course could be done, if you guys find it appropriate/interesting.

The idea was based on actual war "propaganda" comics book "War Heroes".

PS: books/magazine covers have more flexible copyright restrictions. (Not sure this usage might be compliant).
"Only the dead have seen the end of war."
George Santayana, Soliloquies in England and Later Soliloquies (1922) misattributed to Plato, (c. 427 BC – c. 347 BC).

4

Tuesday, January 24th 2012, 5:58pm

The speech bubble of Charlie is missing:

Quoted

Their dope is much better than mine

:thumbup:

Joking apart this is looking good but not self-made.
We should use a 100% self-made banner.

5

Wednesday, January 25th 2012, 12:38am

The speech bubble of Charlie is missing:

Quoted

Their dope is much better than mine

:thumbup:

Joking apart this is looking good but not self-made.
We should use a 100% self-made banner.

:D

Roger that!
"Only the dead have seen the end of war."
George Santayana, Soliloquies in England and Later Soliloquies (1922) misattributed to Plato, (c. 427 BC – c. 347 BC).