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21

Mittwoch, 11. Januar 2012, 17:40

Roger that! W.I.P!

I've got a tip from a friend from BG42 mod: use Goldwave (google)!
It has a batch function.
You can pitch a sound and save the effect, then start a batch processing for all sounds with 1 click.

sweetjosi

unregistriert

23

Donnerstag, 12. Januar 2012, 23:24

also ich gefalle mir mal selbst (is selten..) aber stimme hört sich doch ganz brauchbar an,oderr ? ;)

der dank gilt aber lotte...der das noch bearbeiten muß..und die frau sieht auch schon cool aus..etwas zu lieb für das rauhe "geschäft" ;)

:whistling:

24

Freitag, 13. Januar 2012, 15:32

...
The best solution: extract the sound.rfa from bf1942 to a temporary folder.
Google for WinRFA to extract the file.
There will be 116 *.WAV sounds (see the list).
Seems ok, "Mods/bf1942/Archives/Sound.rfa" extracts 116 files under "sound/44kHz/Japanese" (original Japanese army's sounds).

BUT...

When extracting "Mods/EoD/Archives/Sound.rfa" extracts only 70 files under "sound/44kHz/Japanese" (VN armies' sounds).

Please correct me if I'm mistaken: original "vanilla" sounds (US armies, etc.) are used by EoD, directcly from their original Sound.rfa archive, but Vietnamese armies (ARVN, NVA, NLF/VC) use modified "Japanese" folder, which is packaged in Sound.rfa archive distributed with eod installation files. Also packaged by EoD are those 4 extra voice/radio commands for each original BF1942 corresponding language folder (e.g. "sound/44kHz/English").

So, intuitivelly I would say that voice commands of VN armies that are not included in the EoD distributed Sound.rfa "Japanese" folder, will employ original BF1942 sounds, hence in japanese language, instead of VN. It supposedly occurs with 46 voice commands. Please, help me to better understand BF1942 mod behaviour.

IF... the 46 "missing" files should be "efeminised" too, I can pick the original ones from "Japanese" folder of vanilla's Sound.rfa, process them, and paste into "Japanese" folder of EoD's Sound.rfa.

The same process should be applied to EoD's "English" folder: 116 from vanilla + 4 extra files?

Here is a page comparing both folders' listings: http://www.injustos.net/index.php?view=a…942-x-eod-v2-31

Forgive my confusion... :)
"Only the dead have seen the end of war."
George Santayana, Soliloquies in England and Later Soliloquies (1922) misattributed to Plato, (c. 427 BC – c. 347 BC).

25

Freitag, 13. Januar 2012, 18:07

You don't need to resample the files anymore !
I've finished this work in 40 minutes for all languages incl. french and that seems to be much faster than explaining everything, then up- and downloading the files.
Goldwave did a great job with it's batch processing, the sounds look very female now :thumbsup:
Some sounds are a little bit vibrating but that will not be annoying in game.

English
US English
German
Vietnamese
French

26

Samstag, 14. Januar 2012, 02:47

You don't need to resample the files anymore !

No problem!

...and that seems to be much faster than explaining everything

It always is...

Some sounds are a little bit vibrating but that will not be annoying in game.

As you said before... there's always complaining... no matter what...

Good job! If you need anything else, just say the word, we are always willing to help.
"Only the dead have seen the end of war."
George Santayana, Soliloquies in England and Later Soliloquies (1922) misattributed to Plato, (c. 427 BC – c. 347 BC).

27

Samstag, 14. Januar 2012, 02:52

"Only the dead have seen the end of war."
George Santayana, Soliloquies in England and Later Soliloquies (1922) misattributed to Plato, (c. 427 BC – c. 347 BC).